The song was originally recorded as "Let's Get Together" by the Kingston Trio in a live performance in March 1964 that was released on June 1, 1964, on their album Back in Town.[2] While it was not released as a single, this version was the first to bring the song to the attention of the general public. The Kingston Trio often performed it live. A pre-Byrds David Crosby recorded "Get Together" around the same time as the Trio, but possibly a few weeks later, since the band arrangement includes the riff from the Beatles' version of "Twist and Shout", released earlier in Britain but not in the United States until April. Crosby's version, possibly the first studio recording and pre-dating release of the Trio's version, appeared many years later on the Preflyte album.

A version of the song first broke into the top forty in 1965, when We Five, produced by Kingston Trio manager Frank Werber, released "Let's Get Together" as the follow-up to their top ten hit "You Were on My Mind". While it did not achieve the same level of success as the other, "Let's Get Together" provided the group with a second top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 when it peaked at number 31.[3] It would be their last hit record. "Let's Get Together" was the third song on side 2 of the Jefferson Airplane's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, released in August 1966. As Tim Jurgens said in his review of the album in the January 1967 issue of Crawdaddy,[4] "Jefferson Airplane Takes Off is the most important album of American rock issued this year (1966); it is the first LP to come out of the new San Francisco music scene..".

He called "Let's Get Together" a "most sensitive, hopeful and contemporary ballad", and wondered why it isn't sung in church. However, the song wasn't released as a single, although the album did make the top 100 of 1966, as number 97.

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